Military Use of Biomedical Performance Enhancements: Ethical, Legal, and Policy Concerns

Wednesday, February 24th, 2021
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Add to Calendar: Add to Calendar: 2021-02-24 12:00:00 2021-02-24 13:00:00 Military Use of Biomedical Performance Enhancements: Ethical, Legal, and Policy Concerns Event Description Biological interventions to improve performance, such as amphetamines, have a long history of military use, and in the future, may include more advanced biotechnologies. This presentation discusses the ethics of using biomedical enhancements in the military. The presentation begins by describing the distinction between biomedical enhancements and interventions intended to prevent, treat, or mitigate disease. It then sets forth three principles to guide the ethical use of bioenhancements – proportionality, paternalism, and fairness. The presentation applies these principles to concerns raised by military bioenhancement: safety, fairness in access to military reward, carry-over effects to civilian life, whether service members can be ordered to use bioenhancements, and when they may be permitted to do so voluntarily. CLE Reading Materials virtual attendance only School of Law School of Law America/New_York public

Sponsored by the Law Medicine Center

event is free to attend virtually

1 hour of CLE credit, pending approval

Event Description

Biological interventions to improve performance, such as amphetamines, have a long history of military use, and in the future, may include more advanced biotechnologies. This presentation discusses the ethics of using biomedical enhancements in the military. The presentation begins by describing the distinction between biomedical enhancements and interventions intended to prevent, treat, or mitigate disease. It then sets forth three principles to guide the ethical use of bioenhancements – proportionality, paternalism, and fairness. The presentation applies these principles to concerns raised by military bioenhancement: safety, fairness in access to military reward, carry-over effects to civilian life, whether service members can be ordered to use bioenhancements, and when they may be permitted to do so voluntarily.

CLE Reading Materials

Event Location

virtual attendance only

Photo of Max Mehlman

Maxwell J. Mehlman, Distinguished University Professor; Arthur E. Petersilge Professor of Law, School of Law; Professor, Department of Bioethics, School of Medicine; Director, Law-Medicine Centers, School of Law